Ramesh is a seasoned Business, Digital & IT Strategist, Leader & Executive. He is a dynamic, passionate, accomplished, balanced, multi-faceted individual having provided effective stewardship to many organizations, working in some of the most competitive markets in the technology industry. He has over 25 years of experience, with 20+ at the C-level, in Sri Lanka, USA and India with an operational footprint covering territories such as USA, UK, Nordics, UAE, Australia and emerging markets.

He is known for his innovative, creative and results-oriented leadership in building, transforming and managing businesses with an acute focus on achieving exceptional results, consistently, in highly competitive environments. His focused execution is built on his business acumen, strategic thinking, inspirational leadership, and building high performance teams with a single minded focus on delighting customers and driving exceptional transformation which has most often than not set the pace for the industry to follow suit.

He also has the rare distinction of being amongst the top 1% of his class, a Hayes-Fulbright scholar, Doctoral Degree in Management, Masters in Business Administration as well as Computer Science and a First Class Honours Degree in Electrical & Telecommunication Engineering to his credentials. He is one of the youngest to be appointed as a CEO as well as the Group CIO at John Keells Group and at present provides stewardship for the Digital, IT and related strategy/execution across the John Keells Group, consisting 70+ companies spanning 7 industry verticals with a market capitalization of US$1.4b and Annual gross turn-over in excess of US$ 800m, as it’s Executive Vice President / Global CIO whilst providing leadership as it’s CEO for the Group’s IT Consultancy and Services Organization, John Keells IT.

He has many prestigious accolades to his credit in recognition of his contribution and is a renowned public speaker at many conferences and forums.

You can find more info about him @ Linkedin or contact him by Email or by phone @ +1.646.480.0788

Ramesh Shanmuganathan



I strongly believe that ANYTHING is possible if we COLLABORATE, CO-INNOVATE and CO-CREATE our future. We make this process more effective by helping you to start by identifying something in your business or industry that’s not necessarily a problem, and then go about methodically breaking it down using the following steps.

Step 1: What do you want to disrupt?
Step 2: What are the business clichés?
Step 3: What are your business hypothesis? What can you invert? What can you deny?

After going through these steps, we should be able to generate several brilliant, wacky hypotheses that will challenge your established way of looking at an industry, segment or category.

The general rule is that bolder “What ifs” will offer a fresher perspective. So, don’t worry if your hypotheses seem completely ridiculous since inverting or denying industry clichés can often lead to significant business breakthroughs.


As important as creativity and idea creation are, they require real aspiration to get same to fruition.  A far-reaching vision can be a compelling catalyst, provided it’s realistic enough to stimulate action today.

But in a corporate setting, as many CEOs have discovered, even the most inspiring words often are insufficient, no matter how many times they are repeated. It helps to combine high-level aspirations with estimates of the value that innovation should generate to meet financial-growth objectives. Quantifying an “innovation target for growth,” and making it an explicit part of future strategic plans, helps solidify the importance of and accountability for innovation. The target itself must be large enough to force managers to include innovation investments in their business plans. If they can make their numbers using other, less risky tactics, our experience suggests that they (quite rationally) will.

Establishing a quantitative innovation aspiration is not enough, however. The target value needs to be apportioned to relevant business “owners” and cascaded down to their organizations in the form of performance targets and timelines. Anything less risks encouraging inaction or the belief that innovation is someone else’s job.


Innovation also requires actionable and differentiated insights—the kind that excite customers and bring new categories and markets into being. How do companies develop them? Genius is always an appealing approach, if you have or can get it. Fortunately, innovation yields to other approaches besides exceptional creativity.

The rest of us can look for insights by methodically and systematically scrutinizing three areas: a valuable problem to solve, a technology that enables a solution, and a business model that generates money from it. You could argue that nearly every successful innovation occurs at the intersection of these three elements. Companies that effectively collect, synthesize, and “collide” them stand the highest probability of success.

The insight-discovery process, which extends beyond a company’s boundaries to include insight-generating partnerships, is the lifeblood of innovation. We won’t belabor the matter here, though, because it’s already the subject of countless articles and books. One thing w can add is that discovery is iterative, and the active use of prototypes can help companies continue to learn as they develop, test, validate, and refine their innovations. Moreover, we firmly believe that without a fully developed innovation system encompassing the other elements described in this article, large organizations probably won’t innovate successfully, no matter how effective their insight-generation process is.

Today, once needs to look at ways for SIMPLIFICATION in today’s world of COMPLEXITIES and eliminate the POINTS of FRICTION.

DISEIGN THINKING is the way to SOLVE this COMPLEX PROBLEM. You can design the way you lead, manage, create and innovate. The design way of thinking can be applied to systems,  procedures, protocols, and customer/user experiences. The purpose of design, ultimately, in my view, is to improve the quality of life for people and the planet.



In the space of only a few years, companies in nearly every sector have conceded that innovation requires external collaborators. Flows of talent and knowledge increasingly transcend company and geographic boundaries. Successful innovators achieve significant multiples for every dollar invested in innovation by accessing the skills and talents of others. In this way, they speed up innovation and uncover new ways to create value for their customers and ecosystem partners.

Smart collaboration with external partners, though, goes beyond merely sourcing new ideas and insights; it can involve sharing costs and finding faster routes to market. Famously, the components of Apple’s first iPod were developed almost entirely outside the company; by efficiently managing these external partnerships, Apple was able to move from initial concept to marketable product in only nine months. NASA’s Ames Research Center teams up not just with international partners—launching joint satellites with nations as diverse as Lithuania, Saudi Arabia, and Sweden—but also with emerging companies, such as SpaceX.

High-performing innovators work hard to develop the ecosystems that help deliver these benefits. Indeed, they strive to become partners of choice, increasing the likelihood that the best ideas and people will come their way. That requires a systematic approach. First, these companies find out which partners they are already working with; surprisingly few companies know this. Then they decide which networks—say, four or five of them—they ideally need to support their innovation strategies. This step helps them to narrow and focus their collaboration efforts and to manage the flow of possibilities from outside the company. Strong innovators also regularly review their networks, extending and pruning them as appropriate and using sophisticated incentives and contractual structures to motivate high-performing business partners.

Becoming a true partner of choice is, among other things, about clarifying what a partnership can offer the junior member: brand, reach, or access, perhaps. It is also about behavior. Partners of choice are fair and transparent in their dealings.Moreover, companies that make the most of external networks have a good idea of what’s most useful at which stages of the innovation process. In general, they cast a relatively wide net in the early going. But as they come closer to commercializing a new product or service, they become narrower and more specific in their sourcing, since by then the new offering’s design is relatively set.